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Participant Story: Hannah Green

I have loved getting to know the other PULSErs and being able to experience post-grad life alongside them has made the transition from college to the ‘real world’ much easier.” – Hannah Green

 

 

Hannah Green grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and attended Allegheny College where she earned a degree in Communication Arts, with a minor in German Studies, while maintaining her Dean’s List status.   Hannah has worked with the Gifted and Talented Program in Meadville, PA.  She also tutored elementary school children with Meadville’s America Reads Program.  Hannah served as the Public Relations Chair for Allegheny College’s chapter of UNICEF.  In her free time, Hannah loves experiencing the latest music, television and films.  She also enjoys traveling and learning about different cultures.  She is a part of the East End cohort, and is serving at Oakland Planning and Development Corporation.

Amanda Alexandre: What do you enjoy most about your nonprofit partnership?

Hannah Green: I have enjoyed getting to know the Oakland neighborhoods and the people who live there. I grew up in Pittsburgh, but I never got the chance to engage with Oakland in the way that I am able to through my service with OPDC. Oakland is unique because it is home to both students and long-time residents. It’s been really interesting to see the challenges that come along with working with so many different kinds of people who have such different relationships with the neighborhood.

Amanda: What have you enjoyed most about living in community?

Hannah: I have really enjoyed learning about other people’s experiences and building relationships with my housemates. I live in Stanton, which is great, because there is almost always someone home to talk to or hang out with. It’s been fun developing a family dynamic with the people I live with.

Amanda: What is the most interesting/fun adventure you’ve had in Pittsburgh so far?

Hannah: A group of PULSErs and I attended a gallery crawl downtown, then went to a music event in the South Hilltop. We didn’t have to spend any money and we were able to see some great art and music.

Amanda: What’s your favorite “family meal” recipe for the house?

Hannah: I love Heather’s butternut squash soup!

Amanda: What is the best part of the PULSE experience?

Hannah: I think the best part has been getting the opportunity to be apart of the PULSE community. I have loved getting to know the other PULSErs and being able to experience post-grad life alongside them has made the transition from college to the “real world” much easier.

Story by PULSE Participant Amanda Alexandre.

Read more Participant Stories from Fellows about their experience in PULSE. If you would like to learn more about the PULSE program, please visit our Serve with Us page.

Also, check out other Stories of Transformation:

Participant Story: Christin Adams

“The most valuable part of PULSE is truly getting to know the other PULSE fellows. Even though we all come from diverse backgrounds and experiences, we all have shared values and intersecting passions. The fellows really make the effort to show up for and support one another in the work that we do.” – Christin Adams

Christin Adams, a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, completed her undergraduate degree at University Of Pittsburgh with a degree in Sociology and a minor in Political Science while also receiving a certificate in Global Studies. During her time in school, she was involved extensively with the Multicultural Association, serving as co-President for two years and as Secretary before that.  Christin also has worked with the Nationalities Service Center in Philadelphia, PA as a Refugee Resettlement Intern.  She also interned with the Moroccan Association for Human Rights in Rabat, Morocco and worked with KidsPark in Willow Grove where she supervised and worked with children.  In her free time, Christin enjoys reading, film, digital photography and traveling. She is a part of the Northside cohort, and is serving at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Brandon McClendon: What has been the most valuable part of the PULSE experience so far?

Christin Adams: The most valuable part of PULSE is truly getting to know the other PULSE fellows. Even though we all come from diverse backgrounds and experiences, we all have shared values and intersecting passions. The fellows really make the effort to show up for and support one another in the work that we do.

Brandon: How has PULSE inspired you to live/think/act differently?  

Christin: The aspect of intentional living has influenced me to be more mindful about budgeting, meal planning and living in a communal sense. Even as an introvert, I find myself really trying to make an effort to spend time in community both within PULSE and outside of it.

Brandon: Tell me something you are learning about yourself through PULSE.

Christin: PULSE has helped me reflect on how I communicate and build relationships with others. I’ve especially learned a lot about myself through my friendships with my housemates, and the sense of community that we’ve build together.

Brandon: What do you enjoy most about your nonprofit partnership?

Christin: One of the things that I enjoy most about my nonprofit partnership is that the work environment is very supportive. It’s been great getting to know and learn from my supervisor and other staff members. Additionally, attending the various events and talking to students and community members has allowed me to see the impact that the World Affairs Council is making in engaging Pittsburgh on global issues.

Brandon: What surprised you most about Pittsburgh?

Christin: I’ve had previous experiences in Pittsburgh since I attended the University of Pittsburgh, but the one thing that has surprised me since PULSE has started is seeing how close and tight-knit the Northside community is.

Brandon: What’s your favorite “family meal” recipe for the house?

Christin: Ally’s Chester chip cookies!

Story by PULSE Participant Brandon McClendon.

Read more Participant Stories from Fellows about their experience in PULSE. If you would like to learn more about the PULSE program, please visit our Serve with Us page.

Also, check out other Stories of Transformation:

Participant Story: Brandon McClendon

I’ve really enjoyed seeing how individuals past experiences with community have shaped their operating definition of community, and how our intentional dialogue can uncover certain values and beliefs that we hold.” – Brandon McClendon

A graduate of Earlham College in Richmond Indiana, Brandon McClendon received his B.A. in Arts, Activism, and Community Empowerment. He has a long history of community service through his work as an intern, counselor, and Youth Advisory Council member with Oasis Youth Opportunity Center in Nashville, TN.  He has been currently working as a counselor and teaching assistant with the Summer Institute for the Gifted in Berkeley, CA where he supports special programming, provides one-on-one support, and helps increase academic performance in gifted students from various parts of the world. Brandon also served as a Bonner Congress Representative from 2014-2017 with the Bonner Scholar’s Program and was the student keynote speaker at the 2014 Bonner Summer Leadership Institute at Berry College. Brandon’s hobbies include dancing, running, and storytelling.  He is a part of the Northside cohort, and is serving at  A+ Schools.

Christin Adams: Tell me something you are learning about yourself through PULSE.

Brandon McClendon: I am learning that I have a deep sense of self-awareness and self knowledge. It allows to pinpoint what truly drives me and moves me to live my legacy. It also allows me to know what can destabilize me from living my legacy.

Christin: What have you enjoyed most about living in community?

Brandon: I’ve really enjoyed seeing how individuals past experiences with community have shaped their operating definition of community, and how our intentional dialogue can uncover certain values and beliefs that we hold.

Christin: Describe a typical day at your nonprofit partnership.

Brandon: A typical day in my nonprofit starts with me arriving at the office, checking in with my supervisor and printing off flyers and brochures for my site visits at high schools in Pittsburgh. I meet with students at various high schools to have dialogue about advocacy and community organizing, and the ways that we use media to capture our stories and experiences. In a typical week I’m holding 1-2 chapter meetings in Pittsburgh to meet with students on a larger level to plan community actions around these issues.

Christin: What surprised you most about Pittsburgh?

Brandon: What has surprised me the most is seeing the way that the city defines what is considered potential and what is considered an opportunity to develop something new. More importantly, it has truly highlighted the importance of recognizing the differences between intent and impact when discusses community development.

Christin: What’s your favorite “family meal” recipe for the house?

Brandon: I like to make a southern-style meal that consists of baked lemon pepper chicken with pasta, mac and cheese, with cornbread and authentic sweet tea.

Participant Story: Maryem Aslam

My favorite part of the PULSE experience has been taking the time to live in the moment.” – Maryem Aslam

 

 

Maryem Aslam grew up in Monroeville, PA, and attended Chatham University where she earned a degree in Biology, majoring in Psychology & Human Biology, while also earning a certificate in Women’s Leadership. At Chatham, she devoted much of her to working as an Ambassador for the International Studies Abroad office and US Peace Corps.  Maryem also served extensively on the Muslim Student Association board and student government. In her free time, Maryem loves going on nature hikes, walking in the park, learning to cook, baking, board games, spontaneous trips, and learning new things. She is a part of the Northside cohort, and is serving at the Women and Girls Foundation.

Maura Bell: What has been the most valuable part of the PULSE experience so far?

Maryem Aslam: Finding similarities and shared interests with my housemates at the Chester house such as Harry Potter, Parks and Rec, The Office, feminism, social justice advocacy, garlic, and chocolate.

Maura: How has PULSE inspired you to live/think/act differently?  \

Mayrem: Since I commuted to college, I’ve always lived with my family. I’ve had to adapt to a household with roommates with lifestyles different than my own.

Maura: Tell me something you are learning about yourself through PULSE.

Maryem: I am learning that it’s okay to say “no” and not be as involved as I used to be. I am learning to take time for myself.

Maura: What have you enjoyed most about living in community?

Maryem: Laughing with others and getting to know my housemates

Maura: Describe a typical day at your nonprofit partnership.

Maryem: It’s cliche, but there is not really a typical day at WGF.  Most of my tasks focus on preparing for monthly GirlGov meetings: tracking attendance, communicating with the GirlGov cohort, managing the GirlGov App, and posting on social media (follow us on Instagram @girlgov & Twitter @WgfGirlGov)! I often work on projects for WGF team members as requested.

GirlGov is WGF’s civic engagement program for high school girls. The participants learn about civics, government, women’s history, youth organizing, and leadership by building campaigns to implement policy in their communities. We check in with each committee at monthly meetings and track campaign development.

Maura: What is the most interesting/fun adventure you’ve had in Pittsburgh so far?

Maryem: One of the most interesting adventures so far has been trying to make it home after an event in the South Hilltop. A group of us cool Northside PULSErs were trying to catch a bus downtown, but we thought we had ended up missing it. Instead decided to walk across the bridge to get to the Northside flats and I just remember everyone laughing and having a good time even though we were frustrated about having missed the bus. Luckily, a bus was coming soon, according to the bus tracker, so we hung out at the stop on the end of the bridge. I think it may have been the last bus of the night, and I was most definitely in giggle hysterics as we climbed abroad and (profusely) thanked the bus driver! I guess not everyone was enjoying the adventure, but I had a fantastic time being almost stranded with my friends.

Maura: What’s your favorite “family meal” recipe for the house?

Maryem: Chester chip cookies — I would move mountains for them. Ally makes delicious mac’n’cheese (from scratch!) and Maura’s fritatta is soooo good! Katie & Christin once cooked this amazing soup (that I hope can be recreated)!

Maura: What is the best part of the PULSE experience?

Maryem: My favorite part of the PULSE experience has been taking the time to live in the moment.

Story by PULSE Participant Maura Bell.

Read more Participant Stories from Fellows about their experience in PULSE. If you would like to learn more about the PULSE program, please visit our Serve with Us page.

Also, check out other Stories of Transformation:

Participant Story: Ryan Johnson-Evers

It’s easy for me to talk about differences and diversity, but PULSE involves living in community with people with entirely different expectations and habits. PULSE is a reminder that my way is not the only way or the best way.

Ryan Johnson-Evers, a native of Muskego, Wisconsin, completed his undergraduate studies at Bluffton University with a B.A. in Biology and with THREE minors in Spanish, Public Health, and Mathematics all while maintaining honors his status.  At Bluffton, Ryan worked in the Technology center as an assistant for a year and supervisor for two further years.  Following graduation, Ryan traveled to San Pedro Sula, Honduras where we was a community facilitator for the Mennonite Central Community.  He has also worked as a camp counselor for the Laurelville in Mt. Pleasant, PA.  In his free time, Ryan enjoys playing soccer, Frisbee, and almost any sport, going hiking, playing saxophone and bass guitar, playing board and card games with friends, and reading and listening to music.  He is a part of the Northside cohort, and is serving at AJAPO.

Bethany Arneson: What has been the most valuable part of the PULSE experience so far?

Ryan Johnson-Evers: For me, the most valuable part has been living in a diverse community. It’s easy for me to talk about differences and diversity, but PULSE involves living in community with people with entirely different expectations and habits. PULSE is a reminder that my way is not the only way or the best way.

Bethany: What do you enjoy most about your nonprofit partnership?

Ryan: I enjoy working with the refugee and immigrant populations because their norms and expectations do not always match up with the norms and expectations that we have here. Their resilience is inspiring and it’s a good reminder that my [and others’] value as a person are not based on anything I can do or stuff I know, but is inherent to being human.

Bethany: Describe a typical day at your nonprofit partnership.

Ryan: A typical day at AJAPO may involve helping a client through the job application process or explaining their mail or navigating cultural differences. But you never know what the day will actually bring. Sometimes clients will stop in without appointments, or have difficult and unexpected circumstances come up, and it is part of our job to give sound advice and assistance.

Bethany: What’s your favorite “family meal” recipe for the house?

Ryan: At Burgess 2, we love family meals — we eat together as often as possible. Our most common meal is tacos, but at every meal there’s always rice and beans. And whatever we eat, it’s always a lot of it.

Bethany: What is the best part of the PULSE experience?

Ryan: The community. It’s great to have support when you need it and friends to hang out with and people going through the same things that you are. I think all of the PULSE participants are really cool and inspiring.

Story by PULSE Participant Bethany Arneson.

Read more Participant Stories from Fellows about their experience in PULSE. If you would like to learn more about the PULSE program, please visit our Serve with Us page.

Also, check out other Stories of Transformation:

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